Lasagne – Should You Pay for It If You Didn’t Order It?

Have you ever purposely put someone in a situation just to see how they handle themselves?  I did this yesterday, not to watch the poor girl sweat, but to see how well she had been trained to deliver good customer service.

Yesterday I had lunch with a client at a local restaurant.  It is a great Italian restaurant that has good food and good service. I ordered Rosemary Chicken and my client ordered the Whitefish.  We had both decided to order healthier entrees because we started our conversation about our workout routines and watching what we eat.  The server brought us water and bread promptly and was very nice.  When she delivered our meals, she instantly knew something was wrong.  Once she put my lunch in front of me, she apologized to my client and stated that she entered in the wrong entree into the computer.  She placed a large serving of lasagne in front of him.  I joked with him that he was going to have to run 10 miles to work off those calories.

The server did offer to bring him the fish, but we were pressed for time and didn’t want to wait for a new entree.  She said that she would see what she could do.  So, he ate half of the lasagne.  I told him that if they were smart, they wouldn’t charge him for his meal since it wasn’t what he ordered.

When the check came, his meal was on the bill.  My client wondered if he should say anything, but didn’t want to embarrass me.  Since he is such a kind person and I knew he would handle it tactfully, I told him to go ahead so that we could see how she would handle herself and what her customer service skills were like.  I said that the way she would handle herself would reflect two things – her personal outlook on serving customers and how well the restaurant has trained it’s staff to resolve these situations on their own.

The conversation went like this-

“I’m surprised that I’m being charged for the lasagne when I didn’t order it.”

“Well, remember, I rang in the wrong item.”

“Yes, but it’s not what I ordered and I only ate it because we didn’t have time to wait for a new entree.”

“Do you want me to get a manager to come out and talk to you about it?” she asked.

“No, you can talk to them to see how they want to handle it. Thanks.” he replied.

My client was very diplomatic and never stated that he wouldn’t pay for it.  The server clearly was at a loss in her own resources and had not been instructed as to what to do when these occasions arise.

She returned a few minutes later red faced and very abruptly handed him the check again and told us that it had been taken off and then left. Clearly, she had been reprimanded to some degree.

While it wasn’t the cost of the meal that was at issue, it was the fact that we didn’t think that we should have to pay full price for something we didn’t order and didn’t really want.  Remember, we had started our conversation on the topics of exercise and weight loss.  Lasagne does not fall into either one of those categories.  Since our service had been very good, she did receive a tip based on the full price of both meals.

Ideally, the charge would not have shown up on the bill at all.  Since it did, she should have instantly said that she would remove it when questioned about it.

Hopefully, she will use it as a learning opportunity since it will most likely happen again.  The restaurant business is a hectic one and mistakes happen from time to time.  Remember, the mistake does not define you, but how you handle it will.

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