Transforming the Customer Experience

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Culture’s Impact on Customer Experience

Culture's Impact on Customer ExperienceDefinition of Culture – The sum of attitudes, customs, and beliefs that distinguishes one group of people from another. 

Corporate culture refers to the shared values, attitudes, standards, and beliefs that characterize members of an organization and define its nature. Corporate culture is rooted in an organization’s goals, strategies, structure, and approaches to labor, customers, investors, and the greater community.

Culture is based on shared attitudes, beliefs, customs, and written and unwritten rules that have been developed over time and are considered valid. (The Business Dictionary).

Needle (2004), stated that organizational culture represents the collective values, beliefs, and principles of organizational members. Culture includes the organization’s vision, values, norms, systems, symbols, language, assumptions, beliefs, and habits

Deal and Kennedy succinctly define organizational culture as “the way things are done around here” (Deal & Kennedy, 2000)

Every company has a culture whether you’ve defined it or not. The key is to be in the driver’s seat of defining your culture and being deliberate about shaping it before you are trying to reign in an undesirable culture that has taken hold.

If you find yourself in the latter position… take heart, all is not lost. It is very doable, provided you make the commitment and persevere through the process.  

When you begin the discussion of defining the DESIRED culture of your organization, this is the time to consider….

What does it look like to work IN your company and WITH your company? How is the engagement between leaders and staff, staff and customers?

What is the environment like? Relaxed and casual, or professional and formal? Is it an open working environment or one that uses high walled cubicles?

How do you welcome people in – both as staff and clients? Your culture will be apparent the moment you greet your first candidate or client. The friendliness factor, the thoroughness and follow up displayed exemplifies the culture of your company. Are you a company to be taken seriously, or are you one that looks great on paper, but in practice…. falls short?

Is there clarity around the purpose of your company and product or service? There will be a measurable impact on the success of your company when staff truly believes that what they do matters to the success of the company and the overall customer experience.

How much autonomy will you give your staff? Will they be trained and empowered to fulfill their responsibilities within the organization and with clients?

Do you want a more formal and rigid top-down management style or do you want to empower people to act with the entrepreneurial spirit? Questions such as these will feed into the amount of risk your staff is willing to take in making decisions or working to solve issues for your customers and clients.

Take action in defining – or redefining – your culture by having purposeful conversations with key leaders around the desired culture of your company. As your discussions progress, the process will benefit by giving staff the opportunity to provide input. Staff will have different perspectives and ideas to be considered when crafting the ultimate outcome.

I stress that Leadership should have the most input on the desired culture definition. Leaders are guiding the direction of the company and if they are true leaders, they should have the insight and understanding on the best course to travel.

Make sure your culture is Unique! Even though you may have several competitors in the same space or industry, your culture as a company within that space needs to feel unique. Books are written about Zappos, Ritz Carlton, Nordstrom, Disney, Apple for a reason. They are successful companies with strong cultures. But don’t try to copy them or be like them. I tell my clients to try to be as impactful as them. All of those companies have competition in their space… yet they are unique.

I have my clients show me a marketing brochure. If I can remove my client’s company name and insert the competitions, yet all of the information is still accurate… then there is a problem. It all blends in. What makes you stand out? What makes you different? Your culture will help shape these answers. If you can’t think of anything… start figuring out what customers want that they can’t easily find as far as working style. That will help shape your culture and vice-versa.

Key components in setting a successful organizational culture…

Setting the culture begins at the top. Regardless of the size of your company, the leaders set the tone and example in the congruency of their attitudes, actions, words, and considerations when working with customers, selecting products, and engaging with staff.

Hire people based on competencies AND culture fit. I can’t stress this one enough. My experience shows that 90% of all customer experience and culture work is accomplished simply by hiring the right people that will support and sustain your desired culture. Should you have staff that work against it, or at the very least – don’t support it, this work can be extremely frustrating and ultimately futile. Even just a few people with the wrong attitudes can throw the entire program off course.

You have two people you are considering for the same position. One is competent, yet lacks the years of experience the other does. Yet, the first one actively engaged in the interview when you discussed the culture of your company. You gleaned the impression that they would be very helpful in sustaining the culture you are working hard to execute for staff and clients. The candidate with years of experience didn’t openly say they didn’t like the described culture, but they asked a few times if they could bring in ways of doing things that had worked for them in their past job, if they could work as they needed to on their own as long as the desired outcome was achieved.

Guess which one will be successful in your company? The first candidate. Provided they have the necessary credentials and training, you can train skills and competencies specific to your company. You just can’t train attitudes easily at all. The wrong attitude can derail your culture work.

Open communication promotes success. Companies with free and open communication are far more successful in establishing an engaging culture. When staff feels free to ask questions and discuss core issues with leadership, they’ll be much more engaged and the culture is strengthened, thus the company “team” is united in working in the best interest of the customer and the company reaps the reward of their continued loyalty.

Consequences of not focusing on Culture?

You can be successful in spite of yourselves, but that is not the norm. Not taking the time to actively shape the culture is indicative of a “non-directional” culture prone to reactionary decisions, inconsistencies in customer experiences, and intermittent lucky successes.

Possible Indications of Needing Culture Work

  • Employee turnover
  • Customer churn
  • Lackluster performance by employees
  • Disengaged staff
  • Minimum expectations delivered by staff
  • Low attendance at company events
  • Employee -vs- Leadership mindset
  • Declining customer loyalty and satisfaction

Prioritizing the definition and execution of your ideal Culture will pays off in many ways…

  • Morale will increase
  • Staff will willingly engage outside of their own responsibilities do more than the minimum
  • Everyone will understand and embrace the purpose of the company and actively work to support and promote it
  • Staff will feel empowered and engaged resulting in more thoughtful decisions to benefit both the company and the customers
  • Customers will benefit by doing business with a company where they feel they are part of an organization actively working to help them succeed in their responsibilities and goals
  • That Customer Experience will increase customer loyalty and generate referrals
  • Increased referrals and loyalty promote higher sales, resulting in higher profits, resulting in the successful longevity of the company.

It’s a beautiful thing…

CEX Leadership – Walk a Day in the Shoes of Your Staff

CEX Leadership Tip – Walk a day in the shoes of your frontline staff. So many leaders fight this, but the single most effective way to truly engage with staff and customers is to literally do their job with them. This is not a time to judge or evaluate their performance unless a true issue emerges. This is the time to understand what they encounter every day in their responsibilities. Doing this gives you a sound framework for many business decisions.

Think of the show Undercover Boss. Many of these leaders had no idea of some of the challenges their teams faced in performing their everyday responsibilities. Sometimes it was lack of training, antiquated equipment, software programs that don’t speak to each other, logistical issues adding time to completing tasks, etc.

Sometimes it was the workload. Some found that the workload of each member had increased to the point that no one task was ever done well. Some found that there was no possible way that every single responsibility could be performed in the allotted time of a standard workday.

And the real eye-opening moments came when the boss’s found that customers were part of the issue. Sometimes the customers were rude and inappropriate, so the boss empowered the staff by training them better on how to handle upset customers with phrases to empathize and how to maintain control of their own emotions. Sometimes they realized that customers were expecting things to happen at the frontline staff level that needed to be handled by management. A few handled this by empowering staff more and by making sure that managers were readily available to handle the request.

Bottom line… spend time with your staff. Understand what they do and how they do it. Understand the mental processes required. Doing so gives you an accurate base when making decisions that will eventually impact your team.

When staff trusts that you care and understand them and their responsibilities, they’ll trust you more as a leader. They’ll be more engaged in their responsibilities and customers will experience staff who truly believe and can deliver on the intended Customer Experience.

Bridge the Gap of Customer Experience Perception

Long lumped in with Customer Service, the entire Customer Experience concept is finally being acknowledged as a weighty differential in the quest to build customer loyalty and increase sales.

Business Leaders everywhere must first understand there is likely a huge gap between the Customer Experience they believe their company delivers and the perception of that same experience their customers have as they work with them.

A recent paper by SuperOffice stated research shows that 80% of businesses believe they are providing excellent customer service. That sounds good, right? BUT – the customers of those same companies feel that only 8% of them deliver excellent customer service. Now THAT should keep you up at night.

While this research states customer service only, I firmly believe the responding customers lumped it in with the entire experience, as that is what motivates customers to return or leave.

Leaders typically look at their business goals, they put some programs and training in place to enhance both the experience and skills, they closely monitor what they think is important to the customers and in doing so… they believe their customers are benefitting from a better experience.

Let me be clear, the fact that they’ve even thought about how their customers perceive them is a great first step. Being aware that customers even have a perception or thought about the subject and wanting to improve on it is key.

But the real issue is they often lack the insight as to what their customers are really thinking… as well as what their employees are thinking.

The ultimate goal is to have as little gap as possible between all three components – Leadership, Staff, and Customer Perception. Currently, as the research indicates, the best of intentions among companies have fallen short.

So, what to do? Pick yourself back up, dust yourself off and start again… with a PLAN.

I often find that leaders think they are on track because they WANT to be on track. No one deliberately decides to go off the rails. But to be sure, a focused analysis needs to be done.

This analysis can be as informal or formal as you’d like…

Meet as a leadership team and discuss the CEX your company delivers at a high level. Ask yourselves these questions…

  1. What do you feel you do well?
  2. What do you feel could be improved?
  3. What does your competition do differently? Are those differences perceived as good or bad?
  4. What do you feel needs to continue to be done or started to improve the CEX? Be as honest and candid as you can during these discussions. There is no blame to be placed, only a plan to improve for the future.

Now, these same questions need to be asked of your staff and your customers. The logistics may take some figuring, but this can be done in a variety of ways conducive to your setting.

My suggestion – Gather your staff and have them break into groups of 6-8 and document their answers to the four questions on one sheet. Analyze the answers from those groups and note the answers for trends and ideas.

Then do the same with customers. Focus groups, a cross section, industry-specific, etc… simply starting is key. Each specific situation may dictate a completely different model than another, but the key is to get the feedback from as many customers as possible to get a true feeling of how they feel your company works with them. Think TripAdvisor.

Next, examine the responses between the three groups – Leadership, Staff, and Customers – and note the disparity and similarities between answers.

All four areas are important…

1)  What you do well indicates what draws your customers back and where staff feels training, empowerment, and capabilities are strong.

2)  What needs to be improved are key indicators of what could cause your customers to leave and staff to become disengaged.

3)  Just because your competition does something differently does not mean your company should adopt their practice, but be aware enough to know if your customers feel those differences add value.

4)  Pay particular attention to what they feel needs to continue to be done. The buy-in here is easily granted because it is already being done and not viewed as “extra work.” Things to start can be prioritized based on a variety of considerations, but be sure to consider each one.

Going through this exercise takes some planning and time, but the insight gained will be worth every bit of effort. Getting into the minds of your staff and customers is the single best way to identifying and bridging the gap between leadership’s and customer’s perceptions of the Customer Experience being delivered.

Customer Experience Lessons from a Crew Regatta

Customer Experience Requires Teamwork

Teamwork was the focus of my weekend recently. Two of my kids just finished their last crew regatta of the fall season. We were up in the Leelanau Peninsula in Michigan and the scenery couldn’t have been better. We caught the last part of the colors and the temperatures were crisp and best of all… NO RAIN.

But, the reason I bring up the regatta is how essential teamwork is in the sport of crew. I know, I know, teamwork is in all team sports. But, I have found that in football, soccer, basketball, lacrosse, volleyball, etc there always seems to be one or two players that really stand out. Some players are known as “ball hogs.” There are also many opportunities for some players to receive all of the glory while the rest of their teammates, simply by lack of mention, seem to be almost insignificant or regarded as less important. Often, some players never even get the ball during a play or even entire quarter or half of a game.

Not in crew. In crew, everyone rows… all the time. There are no timeouts, no water breaks, rotations, etc. Everyone in that boat has a role to play for the duration of the race. The coxswain guides the rowers in their pace and direction and the rowers follow that lead. Each rower has a role and purpose, regardless of their position in the boat. If one rower loses their focus for just a second, the entire boat feels it. Worse yet, if one rower “catches a crab,” it’s a public embarrassment for that rower and the entire boat suffers. And… the crew team is responsible for loading and unloading the boats from the trailer, rigging up the arms, attaching their oars, carrying the boats down to the water, taking them out of the water, and carrying the oars for the boat next scheduled to race.

A successful race comes together when all members of the boat are in such sync that they hardly even notice the effort their bodies are expending. While their bodies are screaming with the pain of lactic acid in their muscles, their shoulders and legs throbbing, and their hands literally blistered… the observer only sees a boat cruising through the water with powerful grace.

My point is this… business is very much the same as a crew boat. There are owners and CEOs, middle management and front line staff. There are so many different ways that each of these positions work into the overall Customer Experience. When all of these positions are in sync, communicate, know their roles and how they impact the roles of others, and all understand and work toward the same common goal… the experience for the customer is the same as the observer of the crew regatta… powerful grace in motion. They don’t know everything that goes on behind the scenes to “make the magic happen,” only that they enjoy working with you because you make it seem effortless and natural.

So, consider how well your teams, silos, and departments work together. Keep in mind that the customer never experiences your company silo by silo, but across silos. How well the team functions together across the customers journey is notice by the customer.

Make the time and effort to build teamwork in your company. Have functions, speakers, workshops, etc to keep your teams in sync with the overall goal of creating experiences your customers want again and again… with you.

Customer Service – Do You Give Empty Compliments to Your Customer Facing Staff?

Compliments are always good, right? Especially a compliment given to an employee for delivering good customer service, right?compliment

Actually…. no.

I’ll explain.

I once worked with a company in which the Director of the Customer Relations department would walk through the department and say “You guys are Rockstars!”  When an employee would speak with him privately, he would discuss their issue and upon leaving would say “You’re a Rockstar!”

This seems a good practice… until you hear his staff members say…”If he calls me a Rockstar once more, I’m going to lose my mind!” I asked them to explain.

It seems that, while well intended, his compliments were completely empty. His staff felt that he had absolutely no understanding of the stress of their jobs, the hoops they had to jump through to make or keep customers happy, the stressful interactions involved with other departments to move up orders or how unreasonable many of their clients were. Their manager had given up asking him for assistance in these areas because he was torn in too many directions and offered no support to that department within the company.

Once I pressed them for more information, the staff told me that the compliments from the Director meant nothing, while the compliments from their manager meant everything to them.

The manager would give the following compliments…

“I noticed how you really went to bat for that customer and did everything possible to move their order up to meet their deadline. Even though it didn’t work out, they noticed that you put forth the effort. That means a lot to them.”

“I like the way you speak with our customers. You really show a sense of graciousness and pleasantness that I like. Even when the news isn’t what the customer wanted to hear, you really go out of your way to sound genuinely empathetic. Thanks for that.”

“I really appreciate the thoroughness you show when coming to me with a situation. You have all of your facts checked and have a few possibilities for solutions in mind. That really helps me make a decision much faster.”

Specificity is the key here folks. Empty compliments mean nothing. They may sound nice initially, but over time they feel just that… empty and meaningless.

When you give the little effort to specify what you are complimenting and how it impacts the situation, your staff will likely repeat the behavior.

After all, that’s our end goal, right? Reward the desired behaviors and they will likely be repeated. When this happens, our staff is happy and they treat the customers better, customers are happy, they return and likely buy more, and we make more profits.

Bottom line… be specific and sincere. It means more than you know.

Please leave your thoughts and examples below…

Customer Loyalty and Profits Thrive In a Strong Customer Centric Culture

Getting new customers, keeping those customers, and making more money are the goals you have for your business, right?

Then let me share one of the most crucial factors into setting up that equation – DEFINE your ideal desired company culture!

If I could shout this from the mountain tops, I absolutely would.  All of the clients I work with online and in person have struggled with this concept initially.  They believe that they need to amp up their sales force or train their front line staff better.  These ideas certainly come into play, but only after we get the critical step of the culture solidified first. When I explain that customers will absolutely do business and spend more money with the companies that have a solid foundation, know who they are, how they want to do business, how they want customers to be treated, how they want their staff to work together internally, they start to pay attention.  Here is where you want to take notes…

1.  Companies with clearly defined cultures have taken the guesswork out of their daily lives.  These companies know what their mission statement is, what their core values are, and how they want their customers to think of them.

2.  Companies with clearly defined cultures have a high level of staff engagement.  Companies with high staff engagement have low turnover rates, high staff morale, staff feels more empowered, and the staff make decisions that benefit both the company and the customers.

3.  Companies with clearly defined cultures do everything they can to protect the culture they strive to create.  They protect it like a Mama Bear protecting her cubs.  Anything or anyone threatening that culture is diverted into a different forest.  Meaning, if there are internal issues and leadership stands and supports the ideal culture, they will make the difficult decision of “freeing up the future” of those who do not embrace the ideals and are slowly but surely destroying morale.

So, how do you define your culture?  Simple.  Sit down with your leadership team, managers, or whomever you see as a leader in your company.  Limit the group to 10 to eliminate the “Too Many Indian Chiefs” phenomena.

You then need to brainstorm and identify that in your wildest dreams of the best possible world where there are plenty of customers, plenty of business, staff is performing at optimum levels, everything is functioning as well as it could possibly be….  what does it look like, feel like, sound like, how are staff interacting with clients and each other? What’s being said?  What is the morale like?   It doesn’t matter how things are currently operating now, this is all about setting goals and aiming high.  

The key here is to have the conversation.  Define what you have in mind, document it, rework it until it feels right.  Then be sure to SHARE it with your entire organization.  If you keep it in your head, you’ll just be lucky if someone else is headed in the same direction as you.  Leave nothing to chance.  Your business success depends on it.

Once you’ve done this exercise, you’ll know that everyone knows what they are working toward.  Everyone will be on the same page.  There will be consistency across your company.  Getting new customers is much easier when everyone is sending the same message and delivering a consistent customer experience.  When customers have better customer experiences on a consistent basis, they turn into loyal customers.

 

Any Customer Experience Focus MUST Start at the Top

The fastest and easiest way to turn around the lack of customer service that we are currently experiencing is to, as business leaders, practice what we preach.

So many times, our teams within our organization have not been properly trained or even told what is expected of them. Because of this, everything has been left to chance. They are operating with no guidelines or expectations and really have no true idea of what excellent customer service means or even how to go about delivering it.

Leadership has the responsibility for setting clear expectations and guidelines when it comes to delivering excellent service. In order to be a true leader, you must, by definition, have followers.  Your staff will follow the direction and examples you set before them.

So with this being established, it is now up to leadership to clearly define what excellent customer service means in your organization. It needs to be something much more than a snappy motto or slogan, it needs to be something that everyone buys into and can deliver.

Most importantly, leadership needs to model the desired behaviors. Whatever standards are set for service levels, leadership needs to be walking the talk and delivering exactly that. To really been seen as true leaders, the key players should be doing everything they can to exceed even those bare minimum guidelines.

By knowing exactly what excellent service means in your company or organization, your teams will clearly know what is expected of them.

When they see and hear leadership delivering excellent service, they will be learning specifically what to do and say in order to achieve those standards. People love learning from their leaders because they then feel secure in the examples given and aren’t risking too much by trying something that hasn’t been done before.

Leadership is the key factor in excellent service. It is the trickle down effect that carries the most weight. If teams are told to deliver excellent service and the examples are set for them, it instantly becomes part of the culture of service and everyone will encourage the delivery of superior service.

Your competitors are doing everything they can to attract your customers. By starting at the top, your customer centric mentality will permeate your organization and become natural practice.  If you do this correctly,  you’ll create customers that want to go out of their way to do business with you.

SHARE Your Ideal Customer Centric Vision with Your Teams

Continuing on with Customer Service Week, we are focusing on encouraging our internal teams to foster the customer centric attitudes and service.

 

 
Tip # 2 –  Share Your Vision with EVERYONE in your company.
 
It’s not a secret.  It needs to be shouted from the rooftops, okay training rooms and reception area, of your company.  You need to define your ideal customer experience and what it looks like from the customer perspective.  When you define it, then you need to share it with your teams so that everyone knows it, understands it, and embodies it.
It doesn’t matter if you are a “Mom and Pop” shop or a larger company, you must share your vision of exactly what your ideal Customer Experience looks like at all levels.  Your entry level positions should have the same vision as the CEO or owner of the company.
 
Ideally, you can share your vision with everyone during training on the very first day they begin working with you.  They’ll know immediately why your company is different and what their role is in making customers feel that difference.
That being said, sharing that vision must also be a continual process.  We all know that information shared once tends to be forgotten.  By keeping the vision of the ideal customer experience clear and present throughout the company, it will quickly become ingrained into your culture.
 
Leadership must interact regularly with teams, lead by example, discuss ideas and suggestions, and continually examine how the current state of the customer experience is moving toward the vision of the ideal.
It’s no accident that Disney, Ritz-Cartlon, Nordstrom, and Apple are known for exemplary customer experiences.  They have clearly defined that customer experience and how everyone plays into it.

Does Your Meeting Agenda Put the Customer Experience First? If Not, Read This…

customer-focus3Company, department, and team meetings are the perfect opportunity to demonstrate the commitment to the customer.

Often, meeting agendas focus on issues important to leadership, housekeeping issues, new policies, etc and hopefully – customer issues make it on the agenda before “Open/New Items” if they are mentioned at all.  And, if you are lucky, it won’t get bumped to the next meeting because the time allotted for the meeting has been taken up by the previous items.  This again sends the message that the company or department knows they should be paying attention or discussing customer issues, but can’t quite get around to it.

I challenge you to put “Customer Focus” at the beginning of all meetings.  In doing so, Customer  Focus will never fall by the wayside or get bumped to the next meeting.  Remember, the customer is one of the most critical components of a successful business.  Demonstrate this commitment and importance by addressing customer…

  • training
  • initiatives
  • feedback
  • suggestions
  • experiences
  • priorities

…. at the beginning of all meetings.  This sets the tone and keeps everyone focused on the benefit to the customer at all times.  If you don’t place it as a priority, then how would your staff know that it’s a priority in practice?

The Best Customer Experience Begins with Customer Service Training – Part One

As a business coach for companies, both large and small, that want to deliver a customer service experience to bring in more money from their customers, I’m often asked “Where do I begin?”

It’s just like eating an elephant… One step at a time.

Successful companies follow seven systematic steps when

1.  Developing a complete training game plan – Before you start on a cross country road trip from New York to Los Angeles, you would make sure that you have a sound stable vehicle to get you there, you’d map out a route, plan how long you’d like to travel each day, approximately where you will lodge for the night along the way, etc.  The same thing applies here.  There must be a guideline mapped out detailing when the training process will start, who will be involved, what will be covered, approximately when it will be complete, etc.

2.  Onboard for successful fit and service assimilation – The way you bring new hires into your company sets the tone for their training experience and subsequent service.  You must think start to finish in this process.  Welcome them into your organization as a valued member of the team.  Show them how important they and their role is in the overall vision of the customer experience.

3. Set clear and specific service expectations – This is one of the areas that many business leaders complain about the most, yet this is the one area I feel is most neglected.  When you are training someone as to how you’d like them to treat your customers, you MUST be specifically clear.  “Be Nice” is too general  Nice means different things to different people and is never consistent.  You need to spell out how you’d like your team to engage with your customers at each and every touchpoint and exactly how they can best serve the customer.

4. Have an accountability system for service expectations – Once you’ve set and trained for your customer service expectations, you need to have an accountability system in place.  By not following through on this one step, it sends the message to your team that either your leadership skills aren’t honed enough to follow through on expectations or that the service you deliver to your customers is not really that important.

5. Assess customer service levels from the customer perspective – Feedback from customers and the rest of the team regarding service levels is invaluable.  You can work this into other feedback or survey methods to gain insight as to how your team is treating customers when leadership isn’t around.  The goal is to have customers come to rely on consistent service levels for them to build a sense of trust and relationship with your company.

6. Last impression counts just as much as the first – While you’ve heard the saying “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” you can actually make as much of an impact, if not more, by focusing on how you bid your customers farewell.  You can say “goodbye” while making sure that you thank them, invite them to come back soon, and by telling them you truly value their business.  Train your teams on how to do this well and you’ll soon be cultivating an extremely loyal customer base.

7. Implement systematic continual customer focus processes into your design – Again, the “shot in the arm” solution rarely works in any business aspect, especially in service.  You know how it goes… everyone gets all exited after a fantastic customer service or experience presentation, but then after a while, it becomes business as usual.  To make sure this doesn’t happen in your group, place the customer focus as a top priority at the beginning of every meeting, every decision, every new idea.  Do this long enough and your customers will soon learn and sense that you truly value their business.

To discover how all of these steps truly fit together to benefit your customers, I’m making my last webinar available here for your review.  This webinar received fantastic reviews from the attendees and I gave so much valuable information that I wanted to make sure it’s available to everyone.

Please comment below on which of these steps you struggle with the most and let me know how I may help.

Thanks for reading!

 

 

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